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News   >   Answers to Common Prometheus Questions
JUN 12

Answers to Common Prometheus Questions

By: Doctor Ess
Tim Hourigan  |  June 13, 2012 01:02 AM
you missed another reason why Chance and Revel decide to die with the captain rather than go wait in the lifeboat with Vickers (how they find very attractive). These men are gamblers, they think about odds.
We know from the start of the film, that their location was undisclosed. While Weyland industries probably tracks most of its ships this is a private mission for the "King" .
Nobody knows they are up there, 34.5 light years from home... in a lifeboat which will give 2 years of air to vikers, (presumably less than 2 years if 3 people are on board....) and it took 28 months to get there from Earth. So even if they could send a distress signal, they would run out of air and food before anybody got there. So the "lifeboat" seems like a place to wait for death for a rescue that will never come.
So,
Ben Hodson  |  June 13, 2012 10:22 AM
Tim, good point. They also may have decided that they were "dead anyway" because they did not know about the other Engineer ships. Thanks!
Paul Gardner  |  June 15, 2012 11:45 AM
This is a great article Ben, very thoughtfully written. One additional possible reason for using the flute as a device in the Engineer's control room may have been to draw a parallel between the two ships and their crews, further reducing the god-like status of the Engineers by 'humanizing' them. Janek as captain has his accordion, the captain of the Engineers' vessel has his flute. Perhaps it is meant to emphasize that they are merely the crew of an advanced ship, no more deities than the crew of the Prometheus.
Logan  |  June 15, 2012 02:13 PM
Hey I think everyone is missing one of the key themes of this movie which would explain many of the decisions these scientists make.
This theme would be what I would say is "the naivety of ccience".
Every single scientist was portrayed as being naive, they were only concerned about answers without being concerned about what the consequences of finding these answers would be. This has been a major criticism of Science and Technology in the modern world by many philosophers and theologians. This also explains as to why the only person to survive in the movie is the one who retains her faith for believing in something bigger than herself.
Ridley waned the scientists to be portrayed as people that think they know the answers, but are truly clueless as to the questions of "what will happen next?"
They are men who want progress, new technologies, and answers without knowing what the consequences will be. The Scientists are essentially trying to conquer nature (Weiland trying to live forever) but man has been made in nature, and by conquering it, they will only be conquering themselves.

Hopefully that wasn't to confusing.

Logan  |  June 15, 2012 03:25 PM
sorry "Naivety of Science"
Brad Hodson  |  June 15, 2012 05:30 PM
Logan, those are some good points as well. Science can advance, but at what cost? That's where the line between David and the rest of humanity is blurred. While he might be considered "better" than human in many ways, it's almost a situation where the defects make the human perfection, not perceived perfection itself.
Ben Hodson  |  June 15, 2012 05:46 PM
Paul - I love your thought on the flute. I never saw the comparison between Janek's accordion and the flute. Great point.

Logan - I love the idea. That would explain a lot about how the scientists act. I am just not sure if it is intentional.
Mr. Fanboy  |  June 15, 2012 07:43 PM
I wonder if the reason why the Engineer went to attack Shaw was because David told him to. Think about it, David is the only one who can speak to them, and he's basically incapacitated in the Juggernaut. The Engineer has basically already all but destroyed him. His only chance is by some chance to get Shaw to kill the Engineer. So he tells the Engineer to kill Shaw, and then calls Shaw to warn her. That way she can prepare and find some way to carry it out. Then when Shaw returns to him, he's her partner and can continue on with his plans somehow.

Still didn't enjoy the movie. Like many people have said, seemed much more like a pilot for a TV show (Lindelof's contribution) than a movie. You did a great job of trying to figure out the motivations behind the film, but it just didn't come across as a very compelling or interesting journey. Without some sort of sequel to expand the ideas and bring at least some of them to fruition, it's almost pointless.
Ben Hodson  |  June 15, 2012 08:09 PM
Mr. Fanboy - totally reasonable opinion and I can sympathize. I am definitely expecting the sequel to make it worth it so I will be disappointed if not. Also, if your idea about David is true, then that would be super devious as it would have made David's scheme actually be to kill Shaw at the end. Could be interesting.
Mr. Fanboy  |  June 16, 2012 07:28 AM
Well, My guess is he wasn't actually trying to kill Shaw, it was just his only (or best) card left to play. The Engineer isn't going to give a crap about him, so his best hope is to get Shaw to kill the engineer somehow. Clearly she's proven herself enough of a survivor by essentially using the autodoc on herself, so he probably figures she's got a chance of eliminating the Engineer somehow as well. So he warns her giving her a little time to prepare. Once the engineer is gone, Shaw will likely head back to David and he can feed her whatever bulls*t he thinks will get her to do what he wants. And off too space they go, maybe to the Engineer home world, maybe somewhere else. Only David really knows...
Atleast, that's what I hope happened, I hope that in 3-4 years we have a much better opinion of this movie once the sequel is released...
Mr. Fanboy  |  June 16, 2012 10:02 AM
Well, My guess is he wasn't actually trying to kill Shaw, it was just his only (or best) card left to play. The Engineer isn't going to give a crap about him, so his best hope is to get Shaw to kill the engineer somehow. Clearly she's proven herself enough of a survivor by essentially using the autodoc on herself, so he probably figures she's got a chance of eliminating the Engineer somehow as well. So he warns her giving her a little time to prepare. Once the engineer is gone, Shaw will likely head back to David and he can feed her whatever bulls*t he thinks will get her to do what he wants. And off too space they go, maybe to the Engineer home world, maybe somewhere else. Only David really knows...
Atleast, that's what I hope happened, I hope that in 3-4 years we have a much better opinion of this movie once the sequel is released...
Mr. Fanoy  |  June 16, 2012 10:02 AM
Sorry. Duplicate post. Please delete.
Logan  |  June 16, 2012 11:00 AM
Ben, I have to believe it's intentional simply because Ridley seems to have these similar themes in his other Sci-fi works, particularly in "Blade Runner". It just doesn't seem like Ridley is a stranger to philosophy or theology as both "Prometheus" and "Blade Runner" deal with the question of what it means to be human in the modern scientific world?
Perhaps the engineer is so angry when he meets david and the rest is that he really sees no difference between the humans and the android, as if the humans are truly lost. (This is pure speculation)

On a side note, shouldn't we remember that when "Blade Runner" came out, many people were confused by it? A lot of people didn't understand "Blade Runner" and had the same type of reaction from critics and sci-fi fans ( very nice looking movie, but extremely confusing plot).
This knee-jerk reaction that people seem to be having about this movie is very familiar.
singlecoilpickup  |  June 16, 2012 12:09 PM
With regard to "What is the green slime David finds on the Engineer control panel when they first enter the Engineer’s ship?", I don't believe your answer is correct. I don't think that's Xenomorph residue at all.

First, Xenomorph residue is always clear, not green.

Second, I'm pretty sure xeno saliva would have at least dried up if 2000+ years have passed.

Finally, when David stretches it between his fingers it flashes with some sort of bio-luminescence that looks identical to the holo recording that starts a few seconds later. So, I think the goop in this case is just part of the Engineers' holo system since the panel it's on is what activates the holo recording. Most of the Engineer technology looks to be at least partially organic in origin, so it stands to reason that their holographic system also runs on something partially organic. I'm pretty sure that's all the goo is. No reason to believe it's connected to the Xenomorphs.
OA  |  June 16, 2012 08:10 PM
Another problem was the comment about the atmosphere having 3% carbon dioxide, and 21% oxygen.
The Captain states someone would die in minutes if they breathed it.

Huh?
Why?

I thought maybe they meant carbon monoxide, but the CO2 issue was stated again later.
I assume this is just Hollywood Global Warming propaganda......
NothingMan  |  June 18, 2012 11:42 AM
"..Engineer they encountered in ALIEN is a different type of being from the Engineer encountered in Prometheus." - ... Yeah.. like that the humans we are seeing in the movie aren't actually from Earth but from another planet that they also call Earth who is very similar to Earth ... So.. 90% of the questions here are answered by some random comments that someone is trying to figure out himself..

Crappy answers..

Simply put for all the questions: Ridley has been sleeping on this for too many years, he fell short of telling a good story which would've explained more about the Xenomorph, it's ultimate goal and where it came from, instead he chose to try to sell a crappy movie about religion which in turned failed miserably.. Unfortunately, he chose to keep his hands in this instead of passing it on to someone who could've made such a better job even with his story line of "Beings being gods"..

Ridley not answering the "Is it Earth?" question just proves that he didn't know what the hell he was doing.. He could've just said "No, different planet.." or "Yes, I see it as the creation of life.." but no.. The guy has been away from the series for too long.

Another George Lucas or Steven Spielberg story teller who lost is imagination and instead of answering some questions, he just goes way off base and provides nothing more than huge plot holes, long story telling about nothing ect ect..

I feel like I should get my money back for this movie..

krisvek  |  June 18, 2012 07:52 PM
I've pondered the idea that perhaps the "Engineer" encountered by the crew is in fact an artificial Engineer, much like David is an artificial human. The difference in body structure can be seen as evidence for this. If true, this would seem to allow for a story structure as follows: Engineers create synthetic Engineers. Later, Engineers create life in a more proper manner (humanity). The synthetic Engineers have been shunned, and pervert the black goo into a weapon with which they destroy their creators and plan to destroy humanity. Peripheral details can be further inferred from here.
Not a lot of supporting information for this idea, but I've not thought of anything that really prevents it, and it seems to make sense thematically.
jcris82  |  December 18, 2012 08:39 PM
what kind of hoodie is dr. holloway wearing when he is at the pool table when david poisons him by putting the drop imto is alcoholic beverage?
Viktor  |  April 3, 2013 08:37 PM
I want that hoodie!!!!!!!!!! pls help

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